Objectives & Key Results (OKR)

Using OKRs, align your business result objectives with impending deliverables and work backlog.
 
Restya’s OKR support is meant to link your Enterprise OKRs to the experiments and enhancements you’ve identified or are putting into place in product or solution development. Connect your Objectives to work items (like Epics or Features) and Scrum Sprint Goals or SAFe PI Objectives so you can readily view the actions or initiatives that are planned or in progress to achieve the Key Results and ultimately complete your Objectives.

OKR Recap

Let’s review what OKRs are and how they can assist your company in achieving Business Agility.
 
Note: OKR (Objectives and Key Results) is a goal-setting method. It’s a straightforward method for achieving alignment and participation around measurable objectives.
 
Creating alignment in the organization is one of the main OKR benefits. The goal is to ensure everyone is going in the same direction (focus), with clear priorities (clarity & transparency), in a constant rhythm (cadence).
 
As the name suggests, an OKR consists of two parts 1) the Objective and 2) a set of related Key Results.
 
We support three types of objectives in Restya: ultimate, strategic, and tactical. These levels’ names can be changed to fit your terminology. We recommend that OKRs not be cascaded and that the levels be used exclusively for alignment between periods and scopes.
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With Restya, you can support three levels of OKR.
You can use the following sentence to help you develop a good OKR when writing one: As judged by< this set of Key Results>, we aspire to be <Objective>.
 
Note:
 
Objectives are qualitative descriptions of what you aim to accomplish that are easily remembered. Short, inspiring, and engaging objectives are ideal. A goal should both encourage and challenge you.
 
Key Results are a set of measurements that track how far you’ve come toward your goal. You should have two to five Key Results for each Objective.
 
Example:
 
First and foremost, we require a goal. We want to “Be Recognized for Having an Awesome Customer Experience,” as an example of a tactical goal.
 
This sounds fantastic, but how do you know if the experience will be fantastic? Remember, you don’t have a goal if you don’t have measurements.
 
That is why Key Results are required. How can we tell if we’re giving our customers an amazing experience? Two good alternatives would be Net Promoter Score and Repurchase Rate. Do our customers think we’re so great that they’d recommend us and buy from us again?
 
However, relying just on NPS and repeat purchases can send the wrong message. It could motivate us to go to any length to make the consumer pleased. As a result, a countermeasure statistic like Customer Acquisition Cost should be included. We wish to please our consumers while reducing expenditures to a minimum.
 
As an example, consider the following:
 
The Objective is to “Be Recognized for Having an Awesome Customer Experience.”
 
The following are the key Results, as measured by:
  • Increase your Net Promoter Score (NPS) from X to Y.
  • The repurchase rate should be increased from X to Y.
  • Maintain an average Customer Acquisition Cost of less than Y.
Having a set of Key Results, as well as countermeasures to push the proper behavior, aids in the creation of a clear and long-term OKR.
 
So we have an Objective and a Key Result to gauge our progress, but how will we connect them to the actual job we’re doing? This effort (which should be viewed as experiments or bets; see “Hypothesis-Driven Development”) that we do to try to achieve our goal(s) should be made public. You’d need something like an Initiative or Activity description to keep track of them if you didn’t have Restya, but we can use our standard Epics, Features, User Stories, and Bugs instead. As a result, we have Objectives, Key Results, and Work Items.
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OKRs should be linked to work items.

Combining Goal Systems

Different goal systems are supported by Restya, and they can coexist. We have 1) OKRs (Strategic and Tactical OKRs), 2) Scrum Sprint Goals, and maybe SAFe Performance Improvement Objectives. Rather than prioritizing one over the other, we might connect them so that they complement one another. 
 
The OKR Goals approach is used to define aspirational company objectives that are then measured using Key Results. Key results that are good measuring outcomes! We can measure an outcome with an indicator, but we can’t change it directly by doing something. However, we can try to sway them by conducting (limited and safe) tests.
 
The Scrum Sprint Goals and SAFe PI Objectives systems are designed to help teams (or teams of teams) align on producing something jointly by setting realistic goals. They are frequently output-based because they last for a brief period and are directly tied to the work we undertake. (Either we produced and/or supplied something, or we did not.)
 
Going back to the OKR example of being recognized for having an awesome Customer Experience, we could imagine one team wanting to improve performance and another team wanting to optimize views for use on mobile devices, so they create “Views load in 2 seconds or less” and “Views are optimized for mobile device usage” as Team PI Objectives to focus on delivering this work, which might help achieve a better Customer Experience.
 
Because upgrading views for mobile devices can be a time-consuming process, the team may deliver its Team PI Objective in stages, with Sprint Goals such as “Optimize views for display in mobile Safari (iPhone)” and “Optimize views for display in mobile Chrome (Android smartphones)” and so on.
 
As a result, in Restya, the entities of various goal systems are linked as follows:
Connect OKRs to Work Items, Scrum Iteration Goals, and SAFe Performance Improvement Objectives.

Restya' OKR Solution's Key Features

Levels of the OKR Hierarchy
 
Our OKR solution allows you to build OKRs at several levels within your business, such as Ultimate, Strategic, and Tactical, or rename them to Mission, Company, and Team. This makes it simple to observe how OKRs at different levels and across different periods are linked and serve as a stepping stone to success!
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Using a list view, you may see the whole OKR hierarchy.

Linking Work Items to Objectives

Link your OKRs to the corresponding activities or initiatives expressed as work items to increase transparency (like Epics or Features). This is useful for both top-down and bottom-up perspectives. It assists development teams in focusing on the desired results and understanding how they are measured, as well as providing stakeholders with information about impending solution enhancements or additions.
Using a list view, you may see the whole OKR hierarchy.

Overview of OKR Status and Progress Report

Use Restya’s reporting and dashboarding features to gain a comprehensive picture of your Objectives and Key Results’ status and progress. For those who need to see the dashboards, you don’t require a license or a logged-in account.
Publish and display your progress toward your goals on a public website for all to see.

OKRs and SAFe PI Objectives, as well as Scrum Sprint Goals

Link your OKRs to the corresponding activities or initiatives expressed as work items to increase transparency (like Epics or Features). This is useful for both top-down and bottom-up perspectives. It assists development teams in focusing on the desired results and understanding how they are measured, as well as providing stakeholders with information about impending solution enhancements or additions.

OKR is a goal-setting system that focuses on bettering company outcomes. Other more output-oriented goal systems in Scrum and SAFe include Sprint Goals and PI Objectives. You may link them together in Restya to increase openness and reap the benefits of both.

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